Unnecessary and futile miseries and sufferings of life.

We have been taught since childhood how fun and wonderful it is to live. The corresponding indoctrination occurs through various methods of manipulating the consciousness of a small being. Touching, beautiful plush toys, kind cartoons in which positive heroes always triumph over villains, children’s songs about eternal love and strong friendship – all of this clouds the brain of an unaware child. It makes you believe in a merciful and benevolent picture of the world. However, as we grow up, we gradually wake up from a colorful and vivid dream, gradually realizing that these are ordinary fables that do not correspond to reality, which we have been constantly told since birth.

Many probably once thought about this mess and the absurdity of everything that is happening. Perhaps many people have realized deep in their hearts that these correct, rational ideas really correspond to the surrounding reality at first. But in the end, these ideas were thrown aside as irrational and phantasmagoric things that did not correspond to reality, or the people, plunged into their own little world of problems, did not attach to them due importance and attention.

Although awareness of the whole chaos around is not enough. Many philistines certainly believe that they are the only one that can make them happy. They are sure that all the life problems that once affected them are necessarily corresponded with their commited actions, lifestyle and/or worldview. I can partially agree with this statement. BUT! What about children with cancer, horrifying genetic diseases, born in extremely inauspicious and dysfunctional places, rape victims? Undoubtedly, some could object these propositions in the style of religious fanatics: “God gave them a trial to test their fortitude and perseverance of spirit” or “Well, they asked for it/are to blame for it.” Seriously? Then you can strike back at them: “Why are there all these insignificant sufferings and rivers of blood, if in any case sooner or later life itself/illness will break you?”. “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger”, — their defensive reaction.

This may sound extremely nihilistic, but why expose yourself to unnecessary and superfluous torment and suffering in order to become illusorily “stronger” in one’s/your eyes, if in any case you will ever decompose, turn into dust, and you and your bloody sufferings that you exchanged for brilliant merits, hardly anyone will remember.

Why doom a living being to enormous suffering in the form of a genetic disease, knowing in advance that their existence will be extremely painful and will end fatally in any case? Why romanticize one’s pain and torment, finding something heroic and courageous in them, if there is not an iota of calm or pacification, but only a continuous gladiatorial struggle for life?

Alas, evolutionarily we are all programmed for optimism, for a wonderful world, an idyll with nature and all other lovely words. When, in fact, giving majestic properties to bodily pathologies is a trait of the philistine brain to find meaning and justify the cruelty and ruthlessness of existence by all means.

All these narratives of society with their brainless and irrational propaganda, creates the archetype of a “brave, optimistic, looking-into-the-future, undefeated” person, and at the same time generates a bunch of unnecessary gestures, suffering, unforeseen incidents and horrific tragedies.

4 thoughts on “Unnecessary and futile miseries and sufferings of life.

  1. Um. You’re an interesting read. Here, particularly I take issue. Life can pitch all the scuz at me it can muster. I intend to hang around, and with great joy I might add, and see who I can piss off, what trouble I can cause in the process. Not certain of any eternal compensation [or punishment] meted-out in the end, why not?

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  2. I thorough;y enjoyed this read and found myself nodding furiously. When you take a step back to examine society from an outside point of view, many of its practises seem oddly cultish and resembles indoctrination, from the smallest of norms. Perhaps this is too much of an extremist view, but certainly, human’s obsessions with optimism and romanticism of pain are absurd and fascinating. Why do we struggle to accept that there is no bigger purpose to pain, no greater plan and that pain, for all it is is actually just pain? Seems to me like a coping mechanism at best.

    I look forward to reading more of your deconstruction of dogma. Would love to hear your thoughts on my interpretation 🙂

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  3. Reblogged this on The girl with the weird voice and commented:
    I thoroughly enjoyed this read and found myself nodding furiously. When you take a step back to examine society from an outside point of view, many of its practises seem oddly cultish and resembles indoctrination, from the smallest of norms. Perhaps this is too much of an extremist view, but certainly, human’s obsessions with optimism and romanticism of pain are absurd and fascinating. Why do we struggle to accept that there is no bigger purpose to pain, no greater plan and that pain, for all it is is actually just pain? Seems to me like a coping mechanism at best.

    What are your opinions? I highly recommend checking out this post

    Like

  4. I thoroughly enjoyed this read and found myself nodding furiously. When you take a step back to examine society from an outside point of view, many of its practices seem oddly cultish and resembles indoctrination, from the smallest of norms. Perhaps this is too much of an extremist view, but certainly, human’s obsessions with optimism and romanticism of pain are absurd and fascinating. Why do we struggle to accept that there is no bigger purpose to pain, no greater plan and that pain, for all it is is actually just pain? Seems to me like a coping mechanism at best.

    I look forward to seeing more of your deconstructions of dogma and hopefully we can can strip away all baseless practices of soceity

    Would love to hear your thoughts on my intepretation 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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